8 Comments
Feb 24Liked by Étienne Fortier-Dubois

It is call a pyramid because of the image of the base of a building. It is represented as a triangle.

The triangle of Maslow would be more confusing, because usually triad and triangle represent a like between 3 things.

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Feb 23·edited Feb 23Liked by Étienne Fortier-Dubois

Étienne, I was in Madrid last December for 6 days, including for the parade on horses and high uniform in front of the Palacio Real on Spanish Constitution Day (accidental, I didn't know.) What I also didn't know was that Madrid was founded in the late 9th century (from 852 to 886) as a citadel erected on behalf of Muhammad I, the Cordobese emir, on the relatively steep left bank of the Manzanares. It was a military outpost for the quartering of troops. You can read more about it here - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Madrid

Today, of the buildings and works of that civilization there remains only a piece of a wall and a closed off area downhill from the Cathedral and Palacio Real. I took a photo of it from outside as it was closed when we went. I found there were too many reference points, but none significant enough to 'feel' unique. We spent 4 hours in the Prado - Goya! - but also loved (in a strange way) the two hours we walked around El Retiro Park with the lake and the Monument to King Alfonso XII.

But I was most disappointed by the food in Madrid. In fact, I repaired to Italian restaurants in Valencia and it was only Barcelona where I felt some 'culture' live.

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Feb 24Liked by Étienne Fortier-Dubois

Three things:

1) Maybe Madrid's high immigration has something to do with your experience. You should read/listen to this excellent piece in praise of Madrid for counterpoint. https://cpsi.media/p/madrid-the-capital-of-capitalism

2) I was pro-Catalan independence until I learned how much autonomy the region already has constitutionally.

3) On Wednesday night I had a lucid dream in which I asked an angel, who looked like a normal black man from the Caribbean, in Spanglish whether Madrid was any good. He said, "There is scarcely anything human in Madrid." Probably not true, but interesting nonetheless.

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We lived in Barcelona for a while and love the city but more for its joie de vivre than anything else. I agree with you about Madrid and its lack of significant sights but would argue that this is part of its attraction. It’s a real place, not a living museum piece.

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Feb 23Liked by Étienne Fortier-Dubois

With apologies to Shakespeare: Some cities are born great, some achieve grestness, and some have monuments thrust upon them!

Madrid is, compared to many, an unpretentious city.

It's also a lot younger than most in Europe. That is why your comparisons to Toronto or implicitly, say, Buenos Aires, are fitting. Perhaps it is akin to Chicago: a nice town stuuck in the middle. Global trade would make it more of an anywhere.

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